29 Things You Think Cause Cancer but Don’t

Cold water

There’s good reason to use cold water when cooking, but if you’ve heard that drinking cold water after meals can cause cancer, you can disregard it as a silly rumor. The viral email that began the rumor involved the notion that cold water interferes with digestion, causin food to turn to cancer-causing intestinal sludge.

Nope. Just nope. There is no research backing up this claim, and it doesn’t even make scientific sense since chilled liquids do NOT cause food to turn into sludge in the body, whose internal heat nullifies any temperature difference between foods/beverages.

Boiling your water twice

You might have heard this one if you follow alternative health news, that if water is boiled for too long or reboiled, chemical compounds form, including carcinogens like arsenic. But the reality is that the risks posed by reboiling water are minimal, due to the scale of concentration needed to bring any dissolved component of water to a harmful concentration. Any water that is dangerous after re-boiling, was almost certainly dangerous to begin with. So the real question is: is your tap water safe? Here’s how to know for sure.

Turning on the AC in your car

This would be true if your car contained enough carcinogenic chemicals such as benzene to make any difference in your health at all. But there are no studies supporting the claim that well-maintained cars contain or produce benzene through their air conditioning system in sufficient quantities to have any carcinogenic impact.

E-cigarettes

You want to give up smoking cigarettes because it’s dirty, disgusting, and dangerous. So you get yourself some e-cigs to wean yourself gradually. That would be fine if e-cigs don’t cause cancer, themselves. But a few years back, a Japanese study found electronic cigarettes contain ten times as many carcinogens as tobacco cigarettes. Turned out, the study was seriously flawed. In February 2017, the UK’s National Health Service cited a study suggesting the use of electronic cigarettes is far safer than smoking. If you do decide to use e-cigs, keep these possible side effects in mind.

Dental fillings

In case you didn’t know, those cavities you had filled a while back likely have mercury in them. But they also have other metals, including silver, tin, and copper. According to the American Dental Association, the combination of these metals makes the fillings, known as dental amalgams, completely safe. “It’s important to know that when combined with the other metals, it forms a safe, stable material,” the ADA says. What’s more, the type of mercury used in the fillings isn’t the same type (methylmercury) that has been shown to cause health problems.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/5-things-you-might-have-heard-cause-cancer-but-dont/ss-AAckMcQ#image=6

Do power lines cause cancer?

https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/myths

Lucky Charms

Lucky Charms has an interesting list of ingredients that might (and possibly SHOULD) care you off. One of those ingredients is trisodium phosphate (or tribasic sodium phosphate; TSP), whch is found in many food items but is also used in cleaning products and paint thinners. But is that so bad, really?

No. It’s not. TSP is a leavening agent (not unlike baking soda, which is also used in foods as well as cleaning products). At the amount found in Lucky Chamrs (and other foods), there is no cancer-causing impact whatsoever.

Candy Canes

You may have heard that candy canes cause cancer because they contain titanium dioxide. It’s quite likely to be true (depending on the manufacturer of your candy cane), but that doesn’t mean that candy canes cause cancer. Titanium dioxide is a pigment that imbues candy canes (as well as sunblock and toothpaste) with a brilliant, opaque white. Titanium dioxide is not a known carcinogen and hasn’t been demonstrated as posing a cancer risk to consumers through ordinary consumption of food products. And it’s a good thing because you know you can’t resist red candy (here’s why).

Nutella

Does Nutella cause cancer? Say it aint so.

Well, it aint so. Rather, it’s incorrectly based on Nutella’s inclusion of palm oil in its recipe. Palm oil can produce carcinogenic byproducts when its heated to a certain temperature—which Nutella is never heated to. And the amount you would consume while consuming Nutella would be insigificant in any event.

That being said, we’re not convinced Nutella is as healthy as some of wished.

Takis

https://www.snopes.com/food/warnings/takis.asp

The Wax on Apples

https://www.snopes.com/wax-on-apples-causes-cancer/

Disposable chopsticks

https://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/chopsticks.asp

Cold water

There’s good reason to use cold water when cooking, but if you’ve heard that drinking cold water after meals can cause cancer, you can disregard it as a silly rumor. The viral email that began the rumor involved the notion that cold water interferes with digestion, causin food to turn to cancer-causing intestinal sludge.

Nope. Just nope. There is no research backing up this claim, and it doesn’t even make scientific sense since chilled liquids do NOT cause food to turn into sludge in the body, whose internal heat nullifies any temperature difference between foods/beverages.

Boiling your water twice

You might have heard this one if you follow alternative health news, that if water is boiled for too long or reboiled, chemical compounds form, including carcinogens like arsenic. But the reality is that the risks posed by reboiling water are minimal, due to the scale of concentration needed to bring any dissolved component of water to a harmful concentration. Any water that is dangerous after re-boiling, was almost certainly dangerous to begin with. So the real question is: is your tap water safe? Here’s how to know for sure.

Turning on the AC in your car

This would be true if your car contained enough carcinogenic chemicals such as benzene to make any difference in your health at all. But there are no studies supporting the claim that well-maintained cars contain or produce benzene through their air conditioning system in sufficient quantities to have any carcinogenic impact.

E-cigarettes

You want to give up smoking cigarettes because it’s dirty, disgusting, and dangerous. So you get yourself some e-cigs to wean yourself gradually. That would be fine if e-cigs don’t cause cancer, themselves. But a few years back, a Japanese study found electronic cigarettes contain ten times as many carcinogens as tobacco cigarettes. Turned out, the study was seriously flawed. In February 2017, the UK’s National Health Service cited a study suggesting the use of electronic cigarettes is far safer than smoking. If you do decide to use e-cigs, keep these possible side effects in mind.

Dental fillings

In case you didn’t know, those cavities you had filled a while back likely have mercury in them. But they also have other metals, including silver, tin, and copper. According to the American Dental Association, the combination of these metals makes the fillings, known as dental amalgams, completely safe. “It’s important to know that when combined with the other metals, it forms a safe, stable material,” the ADA says. What’s more, the type of mercury used in the fillings isn’t the same type (methylmercury) that has been shown to cause health problems.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/5-things-you-might-have-heard-cause-cancer-but-dont/ss-AAckMcQ#image=6

Do power lines cause cancer?

https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/myths

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